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CDC Whistleblower Revealed (Video)

Via: www.youtube.com/watch

Published on Aug 22, 2014

SENIOR GOVERNMENT SCIENTIST BREAKS 13 YEARS OF SILENCE ON CDC’S VACCINE-AUTISM FRAUD

AFRICAN AMERICAN BOYS WILLFULLY EXPOSED TO HIGH RISK OF AUTISM FROM MMR VACCINE

See also: Time Magazine Accidentally Reveals Greater Autism Fraud
jonrappoport.wordpress.com/2014...raud/

And this: 3 Vaccines That Should Be Banned and Never Administered to Any Child
www.wakingtimes.com/2014/08/...ed-child/
Tue, September 2, 2014 - 8:25 PM — permalink - 0 comments - add a comment

Failed Policy, Maybe?: "Dawn of Libya" Islamist Militia Group Seizes US Embassy in Tripoli, Holds Pool Party

Via: www.zerohedge.com/news/2014...pool-party

Probably the 'oddest' headline of the day but in yet another show of disdain towards US military might, the Islamist militia group known as "Dawn Of Libya" has 'secured' an annex of the U.S. embassy in Tripoli. As Reuters reports, the United States evacuated its embassy in Tripoli on July 26, driving diplomats across the border into Tunisia; but a YouTube video showed the breach of the vacated diplomatic facility by an armed group, with fighters seen milling around a swimming pool. A rebel takeover of the compound would now deliver another symbolic blow to U.S. policy toward Libya, which Western governments fear is teetering toward becoming a failed state.

As Reuters reports,

Members of a Libyan rebel militia have entered an annex of the U.S. embassy in Tripoli but have not broken into the main compound where the United States evacuated all of its staff last month, a U.S. official said on Sunday.

It was not immediately known how close the annex, apparently made up of diplomatic residences, is to the embassy itself. Libya has been rocked by the worst factional violence since the 2011 fall of Muammar Gaddafi.

The United States evacuated its embassy in Tripoli on July 26, driving diplomats across the border into Tunisia. A rebel takeover of the compound would now deliver another symbolic blow to U.S. policy toward Libya, which Western governments fear is teetering toward becoming a failed state.

The U.S. government believes the main embassy compound is still intact and has not been taken over, the U.S. official in Washington told Reuters, speaking on condition of anonymity.

An Associated Press journalist walked through the compound Sunday after the Dawn of Libya, an umbrella group for Islamist militias, invited onlookers inside.
Windows at the compound had been broken, but it appeared most of the equipment there remained untouched.

A commander for the Dawn of Libya group said his forces had entered and been in control of the compound since last week.

* * *

US Embassy compound seized... time for a pool party!!!??

* * *

It appears we are gonna need a bigger strategy...
Sun, August 31, 2014 - 10:37 AM — permalink - 0 comments - add a comment

Our "Royal Star" Slips Quietly into Virgo: 2,160 Year Astrological Alignment Marks the End of Patriarchy

Via: www.in5d.com/the-end-of-patriarchy.html

Updated August 28, 2014 by in5d Alternative News

The following article appeared on Marina Macario's website, Darkstar Astrology and in conjunction with Pluto in Capricorn, REALLY big changes are ahead!

by Marina Macario

The New Moon on August 25 2014 is at 2º Virgo and falls within 2.5º of the royal star of Regulus, the heart of the Lion. This is significant because Regulus entered tropical Virgo from Leo on November 28th 2011*. This is the first New Moon to hit Regulus since it changed signs. So I would hope to see this moon reflecting back to us something of what this huge astrological event means for the collective. The transition makes me think of the Egyptian Sphinx, which has the head of a goddess and body of a Lion.

“When the nature of the world is revealed, then the mystery of the Sphinx will no longer exist.”
~ Alice Bailey [1]

A google search on the web will take you to some excellent articles to what other astrologers who are making the connection of Regulus’s entry into Virgo with the return of the goddess.

“We stand at this very moment on the threshold of a new age: the age of Regulus In Virgo. The Age Of The Common Woman. Looking back about two thousand years ago, we see that sometime around the time when Regulus entered Leo, the sign from which it is now departing, Julius Caesar was being born. As were the grandparents of Jesus Christ. No one would have ever been able to predict the evolutionary story that would unfold from those events. Just think of it. Julius Caesar and Christ’s little old Jewish Gramma, who could think they would end up together and evolve the union of the Roman Empire and Judaism into the Roman Catholic Church!”
~ Michael Lutin“We stand at this very moment on the threshold of a new age: the age of Regulus In Virgo. The Age Of The Common Woman. Looking back about two thousand years ago, we see that sometime around the time when Regulus entered Leo, the sign from which it is now departing, Julius Caesar was being born. As were the grandparents of Jesus Christ. No one would have ever been able to predict the evolutionary story that would unfold from those events. Just think of it. Julius Caesar and Christ’s little old Jewish Gramma, who could think they would end up together and evolve the union of the Roman Empire and Judaism into the Roman Catholic Church!”
~ Michael Lutin

Michael ends the article with the story of the Pope opening the letters given to him by the children of Fatima from the Virgin Mary.

“It was said that when the Pope opened the last one, he fainted. And never revealed the contents to the world. It’s time now…. Wouldn’t you like to know what was in that letter? “Per corem Leonis in signo virginis in sororitatem steallarum te salvamus” which, roughly translated, means, “Regulus is in Virgo so move over, Boys. The Patriarchy is fucked.”

Regulus is one of the 4 archangel stars and the largest that actually falls on the ecliptic, the Suns path.

“Early English astrologers made it a portent of glory, riches, and power to all born under its influence” and it is generally considered fortunate, courageous, successful and all those great qualities associated with the sunsign Leo. But Regulus has its negative side. “It gives violence, destructiveness, military honor of short duration, with ultimate failure, imprisonment, violent death.”

Bernadette Brady associates Regulus with downfall which may be just anticipating its fall from grace.

“With Regulus about to move into Virgo, it seems so appropriate and timely as we consider a world ruled by powerful elites and societies ruled by money and power. Now we have Regulus move into the sign of service, resourcefulness, technology, skill and duty, as we consider waste, global resources, efficiency and how to get things working better. This shift seems timely to say the least. We are all called to a service of some kind, helping to shape a better world.” “With Regulus about to move into Virgo, it seems so appropriate and timely as we consider a world ruled by powerful elites and societies ruled by money and power. Now we have Regulus move into the sign of service, resourcefulness, technology, skill and duty, as we consider waste, global resources, efficiency and how to get things working better. This shift seems timely to say the least. We are all called to a service of some kind, helping to shape a better world.”
~ C*I*A

REGULUS INTO VIRGO

For approximately the last 600 years or so Regulus has been in Leo decan 3 which is ruled by Mars in both Chaldean and triplicity rulership. This makes it doubly aggressive and only amplifies Regulus’s conquering and pillaging side further. I decided to use the year 2000 positions of Regulus because most people reading my blog are going to be of the generation of Regulus in Leo (For now!) so my appraisal of Leo decan 2 includes the influence of Regulus.

“They are always right, their rule is absolute, any challenge to their authority is seen as betrayal. Loyality, loyality and more loyality, this is the number one demand of their loved ones. In return for their devotion to you, (and by golly they are devoted), they expect you to defend the values of the pride to the nth degree. Any deviation is a sign of rebellion and must be crushed… Bottom line, the lion is a man-eating beast. It can be bitterly cruel when threatened. You really want these folk on your side for they will fight and defend you until they have spilt their last drop of blood….”

This new Moon falls in Virgo decan 1 which is a totally different creature but is still ruled by the Sun! (and Mercury by triplicity). The energy is still regal but Queenly rather than Kingly.

“These seers usually develop their sensitivity after a period of suffering, dutiful caring and even a broken heart. These folk are good at medicating those who are grieving. They become the opiate So as a result of 2000 years of bloodshed and suffering, the human race has through a broken heart, learned to open its heart chakra. It has also individuated and developed an ego. We are all one yes, but we are all unique individuals also. I like to think of the Suns symbol as both a halo and an eye. Mercury has the healing influence and we may go through a stage of self-medicating to get over the trauma when it becomes apparent just how badly we as humans have been abused.for their patients, friends, lovers, children, parents and any neighbour hood strays…”

So as a result of 2000 years of bloodshed and suffering, the human race has through a broken heart, learned to open its heart chakra. It has also individuated and developed an ego. We are all one yes, but we are all unique individuals also. I like to think of the Suns symbol as both a halo and an eye. Mercury has the healing influence and we may go through a stage of self-medicating to get over the trauma when it becomes apparent just how badly we as humans have been abused.

There is both a Yod and learning triangle in the New Moon chart. Attached to the Yod is Venus/ Lilith in tight square to Mars/Saturn. A battle of the sexes? The Saturn/Mars on Zubeneschemali could prove interesting as Robson says with Mars it brings:

“High ambitions, success through energy, influential position, forceful writer and speaker”

and with Saturn:

“Cautious, reserved, studious, economical, analytical, good chemist or detective, good judge of human nature”.

Both the Goddesses are greatly empowered by the star Merak in the heart of the great bear. Merak brings command and domination but is also empowering. I think the mix of fiery goddess energy plus quiet caution and sound judgement mean that through conflict, understanding is found and it all ends well and amicably. The Yod points to Uranus Rx on Alpheratz, still awaiting to break free of its change. You can see the very strong theme of the transition at this New Moon. It shows the evolution of humans being of service (Slaves) to the Sovereign to one of being sovereign beings in service tohumanity. This New Moon gives us a glimpse of the future where there shall be sovereignty for all!

So what’s so special about Regulus? He is certainly of our time. He is the X factor and the superstar. The Elvis of the fixed stars. He ranks as ultra-fortunate, the most benefic star in the Universe. Medieval astrologers said it would bring glory, riches and fame to all those born under it, and that it was the “Royall Starre”.In a different article, Marina stated:

So what’s so special about Regulus? He is certainly of our time. He is the X factor and the superstar. The Elvis of the fixed stars. He ranks as ultra-fortunate, the most benefic star in the Universe. Medieval astrologers said it would bring glory, riches and fame to all those born under it, and that it was the “Royall Starre”.

Astrologer Anne Ortelee stated:

Regulus the fixed star of kings, the heart of the Lion, Part of the Royal Cross in the sky, described in the Book of Revelations as the Lion in the South, one of the Persian Watch stars, leaves Leo, where Regulus has been for 2160 years and moves into Virgo. We can expect Kings to die. We can expect the peasants to assume the power. Workers will become the leaders. As a collective, we are experiencing an empowerment of the servant class and will be developing a new way and understanding of how we look at power over the next 2,160 years as Regulus moves slowly through Virgo at the rate of 1 degree every 72 years.

In5D Addendum: The timing for Regulus entering Virgo is ideal with Pluto in Capricorn until 2023. The energies are ripe for an amazing transformation of consciousness while toppling down the patriarchal system that has brought us war, materialism, greed and ego through various divide and conquer techniques.


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Sun, August 31, 2014 - 10:07 AM — permalink - 0 comments - add a comment

It Begins: "Central Banks Should Hand Consumers Cash Directly"

Via: www.zerohedge.com/news/2014...sumers-cas

... A broad-based tax cut, for example, accommodated by a program of open-market purchases to alleviate any tendency for interest rates to increase, would almost certainly be an effective stimulant to consumption and hence to prices. Even if households decided not to increase consumption but instead re-balanced their portfolios by using their extra cash to acquire real and financial assets, the resulting increase in asset values would lower the cost of capital and improve the balance sheet positions of potential borrowers. A money-financed tax cut is essentially equivalent to Milton Friedman's famous "helicopter drop" of money

- Ben Bernanke, Deflation: Making Sure "It" Doesn't Happen Here, November 21, 2002

A year ago, when it became abundantly clear that all of the Fed's attempts to boost the economy have failed, leading instead to a record divergence between the "1%" who were benefiting from the Fed's aritficial inflation of financial assets, and everyone else (a topic that would become one of the most discussed issues of 2014) and with no help coming from a hopelessly broken Congress (who can forget the infamous plea by a desperate Wall Street lobby-funding recipient "Get to work Mr. Chariman"), we wrote that "Bernanke's Helicopter Is Warming Up."

The reasoning was very simple: in a country (and world) drowning with debt, there are only two options to extinguish said debt: inflate it away or default. Anything else is kicking the can while making the problem even worse. Because while the Fed has been successful at recreating the world's biggest asset bubble (in history), it has failed to stimulate broad, "benign" demand-pull inflation as the trickle down effects of its "wealth effect" have failed to materialize 6 years after the launch of the Fed's unconventional monetary policies.

In other words, a world stuck in the last phase before complete Keynesian collapse, had no choice but to gamble "all in" with the last and only bluff it had left before admitting the economic system it had labored under, one which has borrowed so extensively from the future to fund the present that there is no future left, has failed.

The only question left was when would the trial balloons for such monetary paradrops start to emerge.

We now know the answer, and it is today.

Moments ago a stunning article appearing in the "Foreign Affairs" publication of the influential and policy-setting Council of Foreign Relations, titled "Print Less but Transfer More: Why Central Banks Should Give Money Directly to the People."

In it we read the now conventional admission of failure by Keynesians, who however, unwilling to actually admit they have been wrong, urge the even more conventional solution: do more of the same that has lead to the current financial cataclysm, only in this case the authors advocate no longer pretending that the traditional monetary channels work but to, literally, paradrop money. To wit:

To some extent, low inflation reflects intense competition in an increasingly globalized economy. But it also occurs when people and businesses are too hesitant to spend their money, which keeps unemployment high and wage growth low. In the eurozone, inflation has recently dropped perilously close to zero. And some countries, such as Portugal and Spain, may already be experiencing deflation. At best, the current policies are not working; at worst, they will lead to further instability and prolonged stagnation.

Governments must do better. Rather than trying to spur private-sector spending through asset purchases or interest-rate changes, central banks, such as the Fed, should hand consumers cash directly. In practice, this policy could take the form of giving central banks the ability to hand their countries’ tax-paying households a certain amount of money. The government could distribute cash equally to all households or, even better, aim for the bottom 80 percent of households in terms of income. Targeting those who earn the least would have two primary benefits. For one thing, lower-income households are more prone to consume, so they would provide a greater boost to spending. For another, the policy would offset rising income inequality.

A third, and most important outcome, would be the one we have forecast from the beginning of this ridiculous central bank experiment: "hyperinflation" (which is not simply runaway inflation as it is often incorrectly designated - it is outright evisceration of the prevailing monetary system), which has been avoided for now, but which is inevitable in a world in which only the wholesale destruction of the fiat reserve currency is the one option left to inflate away the debt overhang.

So without further ado, here is the first official trial balloon - the article that one day soon will be seen as the canary in the paradropmine, and the piece that will finally get the rotor of Bernanke's, now Yellen's infamous helicopter finally spinning. Highlights ours:

Print Less but Transfer More: Why Central Banks Should Give Money Directly to the People

From Foreign Affairs, by Mark Blyth and Eric Lonergan

In the decades following World War II, Japan’s economy grew so quickly and for so long that experts came to describe it as nothing short of miraculous. During the country’s last big boom, between 1986 and 1991, its economy expanded by nearly $1 trillion. But then, in a story with clear parallels for today, Japan’s asset bubble burst, and its markets went into a deep dive. Government debt ballooned, and annual growth slowed to less than one percent. By 1998, the economy was shrinking.

That December, a Princeton economics professor named Ben Bernanke argued that central bankers could still turn the country around. Japan was essentially suffering from a deficiency of demand: interest rates were already low, but consumers were not buying, firms were not borrowing, and investors were not betting. It was a self-fulfilling prophesy: pessimism about the economy was preventing a recovery. Bernanke argued that the Bank of Japan needed to act more aggressively and suggested it consider an unconventional approach: give Japanese households cash directly. Consumers could use the new windfalls to spend their way out of the recession, driving up demand and raising prices.

As Bernanke made clear, the concept was not new: in the 1930s, the British economist John Maynard Keynes proposed burying bottles of bank notes in old coal mines; once unearthed (like gold), the cash would create new wealth and spur spending. The conservative economist Milton Friedman also saw the appeal of direct money transfers, which he likened to dropping cash out of a helicopter. Japan never tried using them, however, and the country’s economy has never fully recovered. Between 1993 and 2003, Japan’s annual growth rates averaged less than one percent.

Today, most economists agree that like Japan in the late 1990s, the global economy is suffering from insufficient spending, a problem that stems from a larger failure of governance. Central banks, including the U.S. Federal Reserve, have taken aggressive action, consistently lowering interest rates such that today they hover near zero. They have also pumped trillions of dollars’ worth of new money into the financial system. Yet such policies have only fed a damaging cycle of booms and busts, warping incentives and distorting asset prices, and now economic growth is stagnating while inequality gets worse. It’s well past time, then, for U.S. policymakers -- as well as their counterparts in other developed countries -- to consider a version of Friedman’s helicopter drops. In the short term, such cash transfers could jump-start the economy. Over the long term, they could reduce dependence on the banking system for growth and reverse the trend of rising inequality. The transfers wouldn’t cause damaging inflation, and few doubt that they would work. The only real question is why no government has tried them.

EASY MONEY

In theory, governments can boost spending in two ways: through fiscal policies (such as lowering taxes or increasing government spending) or through monetary policies (such as reducing interest rates or increasing the money supply). But over the past few decades, policymakers in many countries have come to rely almost exclusively on the latter. The shift has occurred for a number of reasons. Particularly in the United States, partisan divides over fiscal policy have grown too wide to bridge, as the left and the right have waged bitter fights over whether to increase government spending or cut tax rates. More generally, tax rebates and stimulus packages tend to face greater political hurdles than monetary policy shifts. Presidents and prime ministers need approval from their legislatures to pass a budget; that takes time, and the resulting tax breaks and government investments often benefit powerful constituencies rather than the economy as a whole. Many central banks, by contrast, are politically independent and can cut interest rates with a single conference call. Moreover, there is simply no real consensus about how to use taxes or spending to efficiently stimulate the economy.

Steady growth from the late 1980s to the early years of this century seemed to vindicate this emphasis on monetary policy. The approach presented major drawbacks, however. Unlike fiscal policy, which directly affects spending, monetary policy operates in an indirect fashion. Low interest rates reduce the cost of borrowing and drive up the prices of stocks, bonds, and homes. But stimulating the economy in this way is expensive and inefficient, and can create dangerous bubbles -- in real estate, for example -- and encourage companies and households to take on dangerous levels of debt.

That is precisely what happened during Alan Greenspan’s tenure as Fed chair, from 1997 to 2006: Washington relied too heavily on monetary policy to increase spending. Commentators often blame Greenspan for sowing the seeds of the 2008 financial crisis by keeping interest rates too low during the early years of this century. But Greenspan’s approach was merely a reaction to Congress’ unwillingness to use its fiscal tools. Moreover, Greenspan was completely honest about what he was doing. In testimony to Congress in 2002, he explained how Fed policy was affecting ordinary Americans:

"Particularly important in buoying spending [are] the very low levels of mortgage interest rates, which [encourage] households to purchase homes, refinance debt and lower debt service burdens, and extract equity from homes to finance expenditures. Fixed mortgage rates remain at historically low levels and thus should continue to fuel reasonably strong housing demand and, through equity extraction, to support consumer spending as well."

Of course, Greenspan’s model crashed and burned spectacularly when the housing market imploded in 2008. Yet nothing has really changed since then. The United States merely patched its financial sector back together and resumed the same policies that created 30 years of financial bubbles. Consider what Bernanke, who came out of the academy to serve as Greenspan’s successor, did with his policy of “quantitative easing,” through which the Fed increased the money supply by purchasing billions of dollars’ worth of mortgage-backed securities and government bonds. Bernanke aimed to boost stock and bond prices in the same way that Greenspan had lifted home values. Their ends were ultimately the same: to increase consumer spending.

The overall effects of Bernanke’s policies have also been similar to those of Greenspan’s. Higher asset prices have encouraged a modest recovery in spending, but at great risk to the financial system and at a huge cost to taxpayers. Yet other governments have still followed Bernanke’s lead. Japan’s central bank, for example, has tried to use its own policy of quantitative easing to lift its stock market. So far, however, Tokyo’s efforts have failed to counteract the country’s chronic underconsumption. In the eurozone, the European Central Bank has attempted to increase incentives for spending by making its interest rates negative, charging commercial banks 0.1 percent to deposit cash. But there is little evidence that this policy has increased spending.

China is already struggling to cope with the consequences of similar policies, which it adopted in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. To keep the country’s economy afloat, Beijing aggressively cut interest rates and gave banks the green light to hand out an unprecedented number of loans. The results were a dramatic rise in asset prices and substantial new borrowing by individuals and financial firms, which led to dangerous instability. Chinese policymakers are now trying to sustain overall spending while reducing debt and making prices more stable. Like other governments, Beijing seems short on ideas about just how to do this. It doesn’t want to keep loosening monetary policy. But it hasn’t yet found a different way forward.

The broader global economy, meanwhile, may have already entered a bond bubble and could soon witness a stock bubble. Housing markets around the world, from Tel Aviv to Toronto, have overheated. Many in the private sector don’t want to take out any more loans; they believe their debt levels are already too high. That’s especially bad news for central bankers: when households and businesses refuse to rapidly increase their borrowing, monetary policy can’t do much to increase their spending. Over the past 15 years, the world’s major central banks have expanded their balance sheets by around $6 trillion, primarily through quantitative easing and other so-called liquidity operations. Yet in much of the developed world, inflation has barely budged.

To some extent, low inflation reflects intense competition in an increasingly globalized economy. But it also occurs when people and businesses are too hesitant to spend their money, which keeps unemployment high and wage growth low. In the eurozone, inflation has recently dropped perilously close to zero. And some countries, such as Portugal and Spain, may already be experiencing deflation. At best, the current policies are not working; at worst, they will lead to further instability and prolonged stagnation.

MAKE IT RAIN

Governments must do better. Rather than trying to spur private-sector spending through asset purchases or interest-rate changes, central banks, such as the Fed, should hand consumers cash directly. In practice, this policy could take the form of giving central banks the ability to hand their countries’ tax-paying households a certain amount of money. The government could distribute cash equally to all households or, even better, aim for the bottom 80 percent of households in terms of income. Targeting those who earn the least would have two primary benefits. For one thing, lower-income households are more prone to consume, so they would provide a greater boost to spending. For another, the policy would offset rising income inequality.

Such an approach would represent the first significant innovation in monetary policy since the inception of central banking, yet it would not be a radical departure from the status quo. Most citizens already trust their central banks to manipulate interest rates. And rate changes are just as redistributive as cash transfers. When interest rates go down, for example, those borrowing at adjustable rates end up benefiting, whereas those who save -- and thus depend more on interest income -- lose out.

Most economists agree that cash transfers from a central bank would stimulate demand. But policymakers nonetheless continue to resist the notion. In a 2012 speech, Mervyn King, then governor of the Bank of England, argued that transfers technically counted as fiscal policy, which falls outside the purview of central bankers, a view that his Japanese counterpart, Haruhiko Kuroda, echoed this past March. Such arguments, however, are merely semantic. Distinctions between monetary and fiscal policies are a function of what governments ask their central banks to do. In other words, cash transfers would become a tool of monetary policy as soon as the banks began using them.

Other critics warn that such helicopter drops could cause inflation. The transfers, however, would be a flexible tool. Central bankers could ramp them up whenever they saw fit and raise interest rates to offset any inflationary effects, although they probably wouldn’t have to do the latter: in recent years, low inflation rates have proved remarkably resilient, even following round after round of quantitative easing. Three trends explain why. First, technological innovation has driven down consumer prices and globalization has kept wages from rising. Second, the recurring financial panics of the past few decades have encouraged many lower-income economies to increase savings -- in the form of currency reserves -- as a form of insurance. That means they have been spending far less than they could, starving their economies of investments in such areas as infrastructure and defense, which would provide employment and drive up prices. Finally, throughout the developed world, increased life expectancies have led some private citizens to focus on saving for the longer term (think Japan). As a result, middle-aged adults and the elderly have started spending less on goods and services. These structural roots of today’s low inflation will only strengthen in the coming years, as global competition intensifies, fears of financial crises persist, and populations in Europe and the United States continue to age. If anything, policymakers should be more worried about deflation, which is already troubling the eurozone.

There is no need, then, for central banks to abandon their traditional focus on keeping demand high and inflation on target. Cash transfers stand a better chance of achieving those goals than do interest-rate shifts and quantitative easing, and at a much lower cost. Because they are more efficient, helicopter drops would require the banks to print much less money. By depositing the funds directly into millions of individual accounts -- spurring spending immediately -- central bankers wouldn’t need to print quantities of money equivalent to 20 percent of GDP.

The transfers’ overall impact would depend on their so-called fiscal multiplier, which measures how much GDP would rise for every $100 transferred. In the United States, the tax rebates provided by the Economic Stimulus Act of 2008, which amounted to roughly one percent of GDP, can serve as a useful guide: they are estimated to have had a multiplier of around 1.3. That means that an infusion of cash equivalent to two percent of GDP would likely grow the economy by about 2.6 percent. Transfers on that scale -- less than five percent of GDP -- would probably suffice to generate economic growth.

LET THEM HAVE CASH

Using cash transfers, central banks could boost spending without assuming the risks of keeping interest rates low. But transfers would only marginally address growing income inequality, another major threat to economic growth over the long term. In the past three decades, the wages of the bottom 40 percent of earners in developed countries have stagnated, while the very top earners have seen their incomes soar. The Bank of England estimates that the richest five percent of British households now own 40 percent of the total wealth of the United Kingdom -- a phenomenon now common across the developed world.

To reduce the gap between rich and poor, the French economist Thomas Piketty and others have proposed a global tax on wealth. But such a policy would be impractical. For one thing, the wealthy would probably use their political influence and financial resources to oppose the tax or avoid paying it. Around $29 trillion in offshore assets already lies beyond the reach of state treasuries, and the new tax would only add to that pile. In addition, the majority of the people who would likely have to pay -- the top ten percent of earners -- are not all that rich. Typically, the majority of households in the highest income tax brackets are upper-middle class, not superwealthy. Further burdening this group would be a hard sell politically and, as France’s recent budget problems demonstrate, would yield little financial benefit. Finally, taxes on capital would discourage private investment and innovation.

There is another way: instead of trying to drag down the top, governments could boost the bottom. Central banks could issue debt and use the proceeds to invest in a global equity index, a bundle of diverse investments with a value that rises and falls with the market, which they could hold in sovereign wealth funds. The Bank of England, the European Central Bank, and the Federal Reserve already own assets in excess of 20 percent of their countries’ GDPs, so there is no reason why they could not invest those assets in global equities on behalf of their citizens. After around 15 years, the funds could distribute their equity holdings to the lowest-earning 80 percent of taxpayers. The payments could be made to tax-exempt individual savings accounts, and governments could place simple constraints on how the capital could be used.

For example, beneficiaries could be required to retain the funds as savings or to use them to finance their education, pay off debts, start a business, or invest in a home. Such restrictions would encourage the recipients to think of the transfers as investments in the future rather than as lottery winnings. The goal, moreover, would be to increase wealth at the bottom end of the income distribution over the long run, which would do much to lower inequality.

Best of all, the system would be self-financing. Most governments can now issue debt at a real interest rate of close to zero. If they raised capital that way or liquidated the assets they currently possess, they could enjoy a five percent real rate of return -- a conservative estimate, given historical returns and current valuations. Thanks to the effect of compound interest, the profits from these funds could amount to around a 100 percent capital gain after just 15 years. Say a government issued debt equivalent to 20 percent of GDP at a real interest rate of zero and then invested the capital in an index of global equities. After 15 years, it could repay the debt generated and also transfer the excess capital to households. This is not alchemy. It’s a policy that would make the so-called equity risk premium -- the excess return that investors receive in exchange for putting their capital at risk -- work for everyone.

MO' MONEY, FEWER PROBLEMS

As things currently stand, the prevailing monetary policies have gone almost completely unchallenged, with the exception of proposals by Keynesian economists such as Lawrence Summers and Paul Krugman, who have called for government-financed spending on infrastructure and research. Such investments, the reasoning goes, would create jobs while making the United States more competitive. And now seems like the perfect time to raise the funds to pay for such work: governments can borrow for ten years at real interest rates of close to zero.

The problem with these proposals is that infrastructure spending takes too long to revive an ailing economy. In the United Kingdom, for example, policymakers have taken years to reach an agreement on building the high-speed rail project known as HS2 and an equally long time to settle on a plan to add a third runway at London’s Heathrow Airport. Such large, long-term investments are needed. But they shouldn’t be rushed. Just ask Berliners about the unnecessary new airport that the German government is building for over $5 billion, and which is now some five years behind schedule. Governments should thus continue to invest in infrastructure and research, but when facing insufficient demand, they should tackle the spending problem quickly and directly.

If cash transfers represent such a sure thing, then why has no one tried them? The answer, in part, comes down to an accident of history: central banks were not designed to manage spending. The first central banks, many of which were founded in the late nineteenth century, were designed to carry out a few basic functions: issue currency, provide liquidity to the government bond market, and mitigate banking panics. They mainly engaged in so-called open-market operations -- essentially, the purchase and sale of government bonds -- which provided banks with liquidity and determined the rate of interest in money markets. Quantitative easing, the latest variant of that bond-buying function, proved capable of stabilizing money markets in 2009, but at too high a cost considering what little growth it achieved.

A second factor explaining the persistence of the old way of doing business involves central banks’ balance sheets. Conventional accounting treats money -- bank notes and reserves -- as a liability. So if one of these banks were to issue cash transfers in excess of its assets, it could technically have a negative net worth. Yet it makes no sense to worry about the solvency of central banks: after all, they can always print more money.

The most powerful sources of resistance to cash transfers are political and ideological. In the United States, for example, the Fed is extremely resistant to legislative changes affecting monetary policy for fear of congressional actions that would limit its freedom of action in a future crisis (such as preventing it from bailing out foreign banks). Moreover, many American conservatives consider cash transfers to be socialist handouts. In Europe, which one might think would provide more fertile ground for such transfers, the German fear of inflation that led the European Central Bank to hike rates in 2011, in the middle of the greatest recession since the 1930s, suggests that ideological resistance can be found there, too.

Those who don’t like the idea of cash giveaways, however, should imagine that poor households received an unanticipated inheritance or tax rebate. An inheritance is a wealth transfer that has not been earned by the recipient, and its timing and amount lie outside the beneficiary’s control. Although the gift may come from a family member, in financial terms, it’s the same as a direct money transfer from the government. Poor people, of course, rarely have rich relatives and so rarely get inheritances -- but under the plan being proposed here, they would, every time it looked as though their country was at risk of entering a recession.

Unless one subscribes to the view that recessions are either therapeutic or deserved, there is no reason governments should not try to end them if they can, and cash transfers are a uniquely effective way of doing so. For one thing, they would quickly increase spending, and central banks could implement them instantaneously, unlike infrastructure spending or changes to the tax code, which typically require legislation. And in contrast to interest-rate cuts, cash transfers would affect demand directly, without the side effects of distorting financial markets and asset prices. They would also would help address inequality -- without skinning the rich.

Ideology aside, the main barriers to implementing this policy are surmountable. And the time is long past for this kind of innovation. Central banks are now trying to run twenty-first-century economies with a set of policy tools invented over a century ago. By relying too heavily on those tactics, they have ended up embracing policies with perverse consequences and poor payoffs. All it will take to change course is the courage, brains, and leadership to try something new.
Sun, August 31, 2014 - 9:29 AM — permalink - 0 comments - add a comment

Actor and Anti-Vaxxer Rob Schneider: I have proof the CDC ‘fraudulently changed’ autism data

Well, it's about damned time that someone with a name, money, and influence in the media take a stand on something!

Via: www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/0...tism-data/

By Arturo Garcia
Tuesday, August 26, 2014 19:14 EDT

Actor and anti-vaccine advocate Rob Schneider contacted California Gov. Jerry Brown’s office (D) claiming to possess documents showing that the Centers for Disease Control has hidden data showing Black children are at a particularly high risk of developing autism from vaccines.

According to the anti-vaccine site The Canary Party, Schneider stated in his letter to deputy legislative secretary Lark Park that he was “compelled” to share his proof of a CDC report the agency suppressed and “fraudulently changed.”

“One disturbing disclosure, AFRICAN AMERICAN CHILDREN were and still are THREE HUNDRED AND FIFTY PERCENT more likely to develop Autism under the current Vaccine MMR schedule,” Schneider wrote. “This according to the original CDC study in 2001.”

Schneider may have been referring to a 2004 letter to the CDC regarding a study of African-American children which was recently unearthed. Anti-vaccination activists say the letter proves that evidence of a link between the MMR (Measles-Mumps-Rubella) vaccine and autism was suppressed by the CDC. The agency said in a statement that the study’s results were due to issues with the sample and not a vaccine-autism link.

He also reaffirmed his opposition to AB 2109, an October 2012 law requiring parents looking for non-medical school vaccination exemptions for their children to provide proof that they met with a healthcare provider and discussed the potential drawbacks of their decision.

Four months earlier, when the state Senate Health Committee approved the bill, Schneider mistakenly posted online that it had been passed and called lawmakers “Nazis” for doing so.

“This policy of one size fits all Vaccine schedule for every child is as absurd as giving the same eye prescription glasses to every child,” he wrote in his letter to Park. “The fact is EVERY CHILD IS DIFFERENT and there is currently NO SYSTEM or thought to which child could be more susceptible to adverse reactions including permanent injury and death from any Vaccine or Vaccine ingredients.”

A CDC study released earlier this year blamed anti-vaccine activists for fueling an increase in measles outbreaks around the country; 80 percent of the new cases involved people who refused to get the MMR vaccine because of “philosophical differences.”

Editor’s Note: The story has been corrected to better reflect Schneider’s statement.

[Image via Wikipedia Commons]

Arturo R. García is the managing editor at Racialicious.com. He is based in San Diego, California and has written for both print and broadcast media, including contributions to GlobalComment.com, The Root and Comment Is Free. Follow him on Twitter at @ABoyNamedArt
Sun, August 31, 2014 - 7:46 AM — permalink - 0 comments - add a comment

Fusion Investigates: How Did America's Police Departments Lose Loads of Military-Issued Weapons?

"We uncovered a pattern of missing M14 and M16 assault rifles across the country, as well as instances of missing .45-caliber pistols, shotguns and 2 cases of missing Humvee vehicles."

Via: fusion.net/leadership/s...eapons-984250

FERGUSON, MO - AUGUST 19: Police charge into the media work area with rifles at ready as they try to control demonstrators protesting the killing of teenager Michael Brown on August 19, 2014 in Ferguson, Missouri.
Updated 08/26/2014, 10:23AM

Haunting images of local police officials using military-issued equipment to quell protests in Ferguson, Missouri, have raised new concerns about the Pentagon's controversial program to equip local and state police departments with military surplus weaponry.

The program, now under White House review, has been plagued by messy bookkeeping, bureaucratic confusion and scores of missing weapons.

Fusion has learned that 184 state and local police departments have been suspended from the Pentagon's "1033 program" for missing weapons or failure to comply with other guidelines. We uncovered a pattern of missing M14 and M16 assault rifles across the country, as well as instances of missing .45-caliber pistols, shotguns and 2 cases of missing Humvee vehicles.

"[The program] is obviously very sloppy, and it's another reason that Congress needs to revisit this promptly," said Tim Lynch, director of the CATO Institute's project on criminal justice. "We don't know where these weapons are going, whether they are really lost, or whether there is corruption involved."

More troubling yet is the possibility that some of the missing weapons, which were given to local police departments as part of a decades' old government program to equip cops for the wars on terrorism and drugs, are actually being sold on the black market, Lynch said.

"That uncertainty is very unsettling," he told Fusion.

Since the program began in 1990, more than $4.3 billion in equipment and weapons has been transferred to more than 8,000 participating police departments, according to the Pentagon.

"Congress' intent with the program is to enhance public safety and improve homeland security by leveraging taxpayer investments in defense technology and equipment," a Pentagon spokeswoman told Fusion.

While local police departments say they have been suspended for losing track of weapons, the Pentagon says no police departments have been suspended for “use or operation of the allocated firearms.”

Jackson Police Department: Missing M14 Meridian Police Department: Four missing M14s Calhoun County Police Department: Missing M14 Vaiden Police Department: A .45 cal pistol was sold at a gun exchange Philadephia Police Department: Two missing M-14s Columbus Police Department: Three missing M-14s Mississippi Department of Public Safety: Missing M14 Tupelo Police Department: One missing 12 gauge shotgun and two missing flyer helmets Source: Mississippi Department of Finance and Administration

Fusion found that many of the suspensions occur in February, after police departments conduct their year-end weapons inventory. In Mississippi, the Meridian Police Department was suspended last February after their inventory showed four missing M14s, according to the state's Department of Finance and Administration. The same month in neighboring Arkansas, the Lawrence County Sheriff's Department was suspended from the Pentagon program after it discovered a missing M14 assault rifle and a night vision scope that was “damaged and destroyed” without prior approval, according to the state's Department of Career Education, which oversees the program.

The decentralized structure of the program makes it difficult — even for the Pentagon — to keep tabs on the standing of participating police departments, or the weapons they've been issued. Officials at the Pentagon's Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), which runs the equipment-transfer program, were unable to provide specifics about why various police departments were suspended. And many state coordinators refused to speak to Fusion, or claimed they didn't have the information requested.

All military issued equipment transferred to local or state police departments is administered by a designated state agency that varies from state to state; in most states, the program is overseen by the department of public safety, but in some cases those responsibilities are designated to other departments, such as the department of career education in Arkansas. A governor-appointed state coordinator is charged with ensuring local police departments follow federal guidelines. The state coordinator oversees the annual inventory of weapons and reports to the federal government.

The state coordinator for California said he was "not authorized" to speak on behalf of the agency he runs, and instead deferred all questions to the Governor's Office of Emergency Services, which declined repeated requests for details on the 10 suspended programs in the state.

Some of California's local police departments were more forthcoming when reached directly. Huntington Beach Police Department said it was suspended from the program last year after losing an M16 assault rifle.

“It was discovered during an internal audit,” Huntington Beach Police Lieutenant Mitchell O'Brien told Fusion. “An investigation was inconclusive as to how that occurred.”

The Stockton Police Department, in northern California, said it was suspended from the Pentagon program in October after losing two M16s. And the Sutter County Sheriff's Office, also in northern California, acknowledged it was suspended from the program after reporting a missing M14 and two M15s.

In neighboring Arizona, state coordinator Matthew Van Camp spoke more openly about the program, while the local police departments remained tight-lipped. Van Camp told Fusion that there were numerous missing weapons from the Maricopa County Sheriff's Department, mostly .45-caliber pistols and one rifle. It “would take some time to get actual numbers but I think it was 11 or 12," he said. The department was suspended in September 2012, according to Pentagon records. The Maricopa County Sheriff's Department did not respond to Fusion's requests for comment on the state coordinator's allegations.

In many cases when local police departments get suspended from the Pentagon program, they are cut off from receiving more equipment but still get to keep the weapons that they were already given. Fusion identified one instance where a suspended police department in Georgia was twice reprimanded by the state coordinator for separate cases of missing .45- caliber pistols, leading to their full termination from the Pentagon program. The Sparta Police Department was ordered to return all weapons due to "accountability of weapons" issues, according to the termination letter written by Georgia state coordinator Don Sherrod, and provided to Fusion by the Georgia Department of Public Safety.

Photo of the serial number of an M-14 rifle, which the Hall County Sheriff's Office of Georgia lost track of for ten months. The weapon was lost in May of 2013, and was subsequently found in July 2014. Image by Hall County Sheriff's Office.

The federal government is already investigating non-compliant police departments in some cases. The Office of the Inspector General is currently investigating the Ripley County Sheriff's Department of Missouri, which was suspended from the Pentagon program last February. Authorities would not release information about the nature of the investigation. "The investigation is ongoing and therefore no records are open to the public at this time," Mike O'Connell, a spokesman for the Missouri Department of Public Safety, wrote to Fusion in an email.

Similarly, the Office of the Inspector General investigated seven Florida police departments for missing equipment earlier this year, but the all the equipment was located and the previously suspended departments are now in good standing, according to Ben Wolf, director of communications at the Florida Department of Management Services.

In addition to annual inventory, each state is visited bi-annually for a program compliance review to go over the "records, property, and usage" of its military-issued equipment, according to a Pentagon official.

For critics like Lynch, that's not enough.

“The case for giving military weaponry to these small police departments was already thin in the beginning,” he said. “Now that we're finding that there is insufficient accountability for tracking this equipment, then the case is beginning to fall apart.”

See more of our investigation's findings below. This is still a developing story. Specific information about the individual causes of suspension are still trickling in from various local sources across the country. We will continue reporting on this as we get more details.

Huntington Beach Police Department: Missing M16 Stockton Police Department: Two missing M-16 rifles Sutter County Sheriff's Office: One missing M14, one Missing M15 Sources: Huntington Beach PD, Stickton PD, Sutter County Sheriff's Office

Hancock County Sheriff's Department: Two .45 cal pistols missing Muscogee County Sheriff's Office: M-16 stolen during a burglary of an officer's home Sparta Police Department: .45 cal pistol stolen during a burglary of an officer's home in 2002. Another .45 caliber pistol went missing in January 2014. Department terminated from program. Tallapoosa Police Department: Unable to account for three .45 cal pistols issued to a now deceased officer. Lithonia Police Department: Missing M-14 rifle Hall County Sheriff's Office: Missing M-14 rifle. Weapon was found in ten months later. Georgia Department of Corrections: Sold a military-owned Humvee. It was later recovered and transferred to another department. Source: Georgia Department of Public Safety

Maricopa County Sheriff's Department: "11 or 12" weapons missing. Mostly .45 caliber pistols, and one rifle. Source: Matthew Van Camp, Arizona state coordinator for the 1033 program

Lawrence County Sheriff Department: Missing M14 rifle, and lost night vision scope. Judsonia Police Department: Two 12-gauge shotguns missing Woodruff Police Department: Three 12-gauge shotguns missing Palestine Police Department: Failed to report a stolen Humvee within 24 hours. Humvee was recovered shortly after. Independence County Sheriff's Department: Missing M16. Rifle was recovered shortly after. Source: Arkansas Department of Career Education

Don't miss out on any of Fusion's highlights -- get Fusion today.
Wed, August 27, 2014 - 8:02 AM — permalink - 0 comments - add a comment

REP SCOTT PETERS (D-SAN DIEGO) BASHES DEMAIO: 'GAY MAN RUNNING AS A REPUBLICAN'

DEMS NO BETTER THAN THE OTHER GUYS

Via: www.breitbart.com/Breitbart...Republican

Democratic San Diego Representative Scott Peters has been caught on camera making contemptuous and dismissive remarks about his openly gay Republican opponent Carl DeMaio. Peters also took a stab at Utah's Mia Love, who could become the first black female Republican elected to Congress.

While stumping at a Clairemont Democratic Club Meeting in San Diego this month, Peters said, according [to] video and quotes provided by Kyle Becker of the International Journal Review:

"And now he's saying, now he's saying, 'Well, I'm a gay man, I must be moderate. I'm pro-choice, I’m pro-environment. And I gotta tell ya, around the country, where people don't know him, they completely buy it. Carl DeMaio has gotten more—it's so unusual for them to see a gay man running as a Republican.

"Now, San Diego's a little different. We've been electing LGBT candidates since the '90s when Chris Kehoe got elected. Our district attorney is a lesbian Republican. 'Well who does she have lunch with?"

Peters' statement was followed with laughing agreement from the audience. He then went on to remark on the "novelty" associated with being a gay and even called out a member of his own party:

"And obviously, you know, the Speaker of the Assembly is our own Toni Atkins, who is also… So, we're pretty used to it, but around the country this thought that there would be any gay elected officials is very novel."

Atkins defended Peters in a statement offered by the Peters' campaign. She said, "Scott Peters has a long, impeccable record of standing with and fighting for the LGBT community. Any suggestion to the contrary is ridiculous and an insult to those of us who know him. San Diegans don't buy it."

For someone who is so supportive of the LGBT community, Peters appears to have a history of slighting DeMaio for being gay. A few months back, Peter's campaign posted on its own website that DeMaio was a "Mary," which is a derogatory term for homosexual men. (Another left-wing group has also slighted DeMaio for his open sexuality.)

Peters then continued to take shots at DeMaio, again jabbing at his homosexuality:

"He's gotten stories in The Wall Street Journal, he's gotten stories in the National Journal, all puff pieces about how this great, new, moderate, gay Republican is coming out and running for office. And they're very psyched about it. And the Republicans in D.C., they love this."

Peters went on to state (incorrectly) that Republicans have zero African American Republicans in Congress:

"They think, 'Wow, this guy is gonna change our party' because all they need—they don’t have any out, gay members of Congress, the Republicans don't. They also don't have any African Americans. They're gonna get one and Mia Love in Utah is just a real right-wing person."

In addition to DeMaio, there are two other openly gay Republican candidates seeking election in 2014. They are Richard Tisei of Massachusetts and Dan Innis in New Hampshire.

Peters can be seen giving his anti-gay Republican rant here: www.youtube.com/watch
Sun, August 24, 2014 - 10:12 AM — permalink - 0 comments - add a comment

STATE OF PARANOIA: "Man [in CA] with Umbrella, Shelter in Place!"

VIa: www.breitbart.com/Breitbart...-On-Campus

SWAT TEAM SURROUNDS WHITE MALE CARRYING 'LARGE UMBRELLA' ON CAMPUS

On August 20, a possible gunman was reported on the campus of California State University San Marcos (CSUSM), and orders to "Shelter-In-Place" (S-I-P) were put out until a SWAT team finally surrounded their suspect, "a staff member carrying a large umbrella and carry bag."

NBC 7 said, "The first report came in as a man with a long gun" walking on campus.

After about 30 minutes of S-I-P, staff member Bill Craig realized he fit the description of the possible gunman and surrendered himself to police. A SWAT team surrounded Craig and determined he had no gun in his possession.

According to guns.com, Police released the following statement:

Earlier this morning there was a report to University Police of a possible gunman at CSUSM. The campus was immediately placed on lock down. Police performed a security sweep and determined that the suspect was not armed, but was a staff member carrying a large umbrella and carry bag. We are grateful for the quick response by our police officers to the perceived threat and to our campus community for their cooperation during the brief state of emergency.
Sun, August 24, 2014 - 9:56 AM — permalink - 0 comments - add a comment

Unidentified Fighter Jets Strike Libya's Tripoli After Islamist Fighters Say Captured Airport

The genie is now out of the bottle...

Via: www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/0...99.html

Posted: 08/24/2014 7:02 am EDT Updated: 2 hours ago Print Article
By Heba al-Shibani

TRIPOLI, Aug 24 (Reuters) - Unidentified war planes attacked targets in Libya's capital Tripoli on Sunday, residents said, hours after forces from the city of Misrata said they had seized the main airport.

Tripoli residents heard jets followed by explosions at dawn but no more details were immediately available.

In recent weeks Libya has seen the worst fighting since the NATO-backed campaign to oust Muammar Gaddafi in 2011. Renegade general Khalifa Haftar has declared war on Islamist-leaning forces, part of growing anarchy in the oil producer.

His forces claimed responsibility for air raids on Tripoli on Saturday and last Monday, targeting a group called Operation Dawn. But this group, consisting mainly of fighters from Misrata, said on Saturday that it had captured Tripoli's main airport from a rival faction from Zintan in western Libya.

In the campaign to overthrow Gaddafi, fighters from Zintan and Misrata were comrades-in-arms. But they later fell out and this year have turned parts of Tripoli into a battlefield.

Libya's neighbors and Western powers worry Libya will turn into a failed state as the weak government is unable to control armed factions.


GROWING DIVISIONS

Libya faces the prospect of two competing parliaments, after the claimed Misrata victory at Tripoli airport which Reuters could not immediately confirm.

In a challenge to the parliament elected on June 25, a spokesman for Operation Dawn called for the old General National Congress (GNC) to be reinstated. Misrata forces have rejected the new House of Representatives, where liberals and lawmakers campaigning for a federalist system have made a strong showing.

In a sign of deep divisions between Libya's regions and political factions the House of Representative declared the Operation Dawn as well as militant Islamists like the Ansar al-Sharia as "terrorist groups".

The House of Representatives, which has fled to Tobruk in the east with senior officials to escape fighting, asked renegade general Haftar to fight the Operation Dawn forces.

Haftar launched a campaign against Islamists in the eastern city of Benghazi in May and threw his weight behind the Zintan fighters.

His air defense commander, Sager al-Jouroushi, told Reuters on Saturday that his forces were responsible for the air strikes on Saturday and a similar attack on Monday.

Misrata forces have blamed the air strikes on Egypt and the United Arab Emirates, two countries which have cracked down on Islamists. Libya's government says it does not know who is behind the attacks.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi denied his country had conducted any air strikes or other military operation in Libya, state news agency MENA quoted him as saying.

Western and NATO officials have also denied any involvement.

Fighting also erupted between Haftar's troops and allied army special forces with Islamists in two Benghazi suburbs on Saturday, killing eight soldiers and wounding 35, medics said.

The violence has prompted the United Nations and foreign embassies in Libya to evacuate their staff and citizens, and foreign airlines have largely stopped flying to Libya.

Libya's central government lacks a functioning national army and relies on militia for public security. But while these forces receive state salaries and wear uniforms, they report in practice to their own commanders and towns. (Reporting by Heba al-Shibani, Ahmed Ellumami, Feras Bosalum, Ayman al-Warfalli and Ulf Laessing; Writing by Ulf Laessing in Cairo; Editing by Stephen Powell)
Sun, August 24, 2014 - 9:40 AM — permalink - 0 comments - add a comment
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